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Hormone Health

The Important Role of Your Endocrine System & Hormone Health

You Immune System
Your Hormone Health

What Are Hormones?


  • Hormones are chemical messengers responsible for many different functions in your body and are essential for your health and life.

  • Several of your glands, organs, and tissues make and release hormones signaling your body what to do and when. Your endocrine system is made up of many of these.

  • Your body produces more than 50 different hormones and controls many bodily processes.







These include:

  • Metabolism

  • Mood

  • Growth & Development

  • Sleep-Wake Cycle

  • Sexual Function

  • Reproduction

  • Homeostasis (Internal balance including blood sugar and blood pressure regulation, body temperature, and fluid and electrolyte balance.)


Your Endocrine System

  • Consists of a group of glands where most hormones are made and released directly into your bloodstream.

These Include:

  • Adrenal Glands

  • Pituitary Gland

  • Pineal Gland

  • Thyroid

  • Parathyroid Glands

  • Pancreas

  • Ovaries

  • Testes

Other organs that release hormones which are considered part of the endocrine system include:

  • Kidneys

  • Liver

  • Gastrointestinal Tract

  • Adipose Fat Tissue

  • Placenta

Glands are organs that make one or more substances such as:

  • Hormones

  • Sweat

  • Tears

  • Digestive Juices

Pituitary Gland

  • A pea-sized gland located at the base of your brain directly below your hypothalamus consisting of anterior and posterior lobes.

  • Responsible for releasing several hormones controlling the functions of your endocrine glands.

Anterior Pituitary Makes and releases six hormones which include:

  • ACTH-Adrenocorticotropic Hormone

  • FSH-Folicle-Stimulating Hormone

  • HGH-Human Growth Hormone

  • LH-Lutenizing Hormone

  • Prolactin

  • TSH-Thyroid Stimulating Hormone

Posterior Pituitary

  • ADH-Antidiuretic Hormone (Vasopressin)

  • Oxytocin

Hypothalamus

  • Small area of the brain that connects your pituitary gland through your pituitary stalk.

  • Responsible for making and releasing several hormones that control your pituitary gland.

These include:

  • Dopamine

  • Corticotropin-releasing Hormones

  • Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone

  • Thyrotropin-releasing Hormone

  • Somatostatin

  • Oxytocin (Made in your hypothalamus, stored and released by the pituitary.)

Pineal Gland

  • Tiny gland located beneath the back part of the corpus collosum of your brain where the two parts of your brain are connected.

  • Responsible for the release of melatonin needed to regulate your sleep-wake cycle.

Thyroid Gland

  • Small, butterfly-shaped gland located at the front of your neck responsible for controlling your metabolism. (How your body transforms food consumed into energy.)

Releases hormones such as:

  • T3-Triiodothyronine

  • T4-Thyroxine

  • Calcitonin

Parathyroid Gland

  • Four tiny glands located behind your thyroid gland.

  • Responsible for releasing PTH-parathyroid hormone which balances the calcium in your blood and bones.

Adrenal Glands

  • Small, triangle-shaped glands which sit on top of your kidneys known as suprarenal glands.

  • Responsible for making hormones such as:

  • Cortisol

  • Adrenaline (Epinephrine)

  • Noradrenaline (Norepinephrine)

  • Aldosterone

  • DHEA

  • Androgens

Pancreas

  • Small organ located in the back of your abdomen and is part of the digestive and endocrine systems.

  • Endocrine cells or islet cells in your pancreas are responsible for making hormones such as:

Insulin

Glucagon


What Are Hormones?

  • Hormones are chemical messengers responsible for many different functions in your body and are essential for your health and life.

  • Several of your glands, organs, and tissues make and release hormones signaling your body what to do and when. Your endocrine system is made up of many of these.

  • Your body produces more than 50 different hormones and controls many bodily processes.

These include:

  • Metabolism

  • Mood

  • Growth & Development

  • Sleep-Wake Cycle

  • Sexual Function

  • Reproduction

  • Homeostasis (Internal balance including blood sugar and blood pressure regulation, body temperature, and fluid and electrolyte balance.)


Your Endocrine System

  • Consists of a group of glands where most hormones are made and released directly into your bloodstream.

These Include:

  • Adrenal Glands

  • Pituitary Gland

  • Pineal Gland

  • Thyroid

  • Parathyroid Glands

  • Pancreas

  • Ovaries

  • Testes

Other organs that release hormones which are considered part of the endocrine system include:

  • Kidneys

  • Liver

  • Gastrointestinal Tract

  • Adipose Fat Tissue

  • Placenta

Glands are organs that make one or more substances such as:

  • Hormones

  • Sweat

  • Tears

  • Digestive Juices

Pituitary Gland

  • A pea-sized gland located at the base of your brain directly below your hypothalamus consisting of anterior and posterior lobes.

  • Responsible for releasing several hormones controlling the functions of your endocrine glands.

Anterior Pituitary Makes and releases six hormones which include:

  • ACTH-Adrenocorticotropic Hormone

  • FSH-Folicle-Stimulating Hormone

  • HGH-Human Growth Hormone

  • LH-Lutenizing Hormone

  • Prolactin

  • TSH-Thyroid Stimulating Hormone

Posterior Pituitary

  • ADH-Antidiuretic Hormone (Vasopressin)

  • Oxytocin

Hypothalamus

  • Small area of the brain that connects your pituitary gland through your pituitary stalk.

  • Responsible for making and releasing several hormones that control your pituitary gland.

These include:

  • Dopamine

  • Corticotropin-releasing Hormones

  • Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone

  • Thyrotropin-releasing Hormone

  • Somatostatin

  • Oxytocin (Made in your hypothalamus, stored and released by the pituitary.)

Pineal Gland

  • Tiny gland located beneath the back part of the corpus collosum of your brain where the two parts of your brain are connected.

  • Responsible for the release of melatonin needed to regulate your sleep-wake cycle.

Thyroid Gland

  • Small, butterfly-shaped gland located at the front of your neck responsible for controlling your metabolism. (How your body transforms food consumed into energy.)

Releases hormones such as:

  • T3-Triiodothyronine

  • T4-Thyroxine

  • Calcitonin

Parathyroid Gland

  • Four tiny glands located behind your thyroid gland.

  • Responsible for releasing PTH-parathyroid hormone which balances the calcium in your blood and bones.

Adrenal Glands

  • Small, triangle-shaped glands which sit on top of your kidneys known as suprarenal glands.

  • Responsible for making hormones such as:

  • Cortisol

  • Adrenaline (Epinephrine)

  • Noradrenaline (Norepinephrine)

  • Aldosterone

  • DHEA

  • Androgens

Pancreas

  • Small organ located in the back of your abdomen and is part of the digestive and endocrine systems.

  • Endocrine cells or islet cells in your pancreas are responsible for making hormones such as:

  • Insulin

  • Glucagon

Gastrointestinal Tract

  • Long tube that runs the length of your digestive tract starting at your mouth ending at your anus.

  • Responsible for digestion and creating hormones such as:

  • Ghrelin

  • Somatostatin Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1)

Kidneys

  • Two bean-shaped organs which are a part of your urinary system which filter your blood and produce the following hormones:

  • Renin

  • Erythropoietin

  • Active form of Vitamin D (Vitamin D is a pro-hormone which converts your body into a hormone.)

Liver

  • Essential organ and gland which is a part of your digestive system and performs hundreds of functions.

Responsible for producing hormones such as:

  • Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1)

  • Angiotensinogen

Adipose (Fat) Tissue

  • Located all over your body including under your skin, between muscles, around internal organs, breast tissue, and in bone marrow often referred to as body fat.

Makes and releases the following hormones:

  • Adiponectin

  • Estrogen

  • Angiotensin

  • Leptin

  • Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

Ovaries

  • Located on both sides of the uterus below the opening of the fallopian tubes and are part of the female reproductive system.

  • Contains the egg cells needed for reproduction and produces hormones such as:

  • Estrogen

  • Progesterone

  • Testosterone

Testes

  • Pair located in a pouch outside the body below the penis and are part of the male reproductive system.

Responsible for producing sperm and the hormone:

  • Testosterone

Placenta

  • Temporary organ the develops during pregnancy providing oxygen and nutrients to the unborn baby.

Responsible for producing hormones to maintain pregnancy. These include:

  • Estrogen

  • Progesterone


Conditions Caused By Hormone Disorders Too much or too little hormones can create symptoms and potentially lead to health conditions and may require treatment.

Hormone-related Conditions:

  • Diabetes (Types 1 & 2, Gestational)

  • PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome)

  • Infertility (Male & Female)

  • Thyroid Disease (Hypothyroidism, Hyperthyroidism)

  • Obesity

  • Addison's Disease

  • Menopause

  • Cushing's Disease

  • Prolactinoma

Causes of Hormonal Imbalance Can result due to multiple causes such as:

  • Adenomas and Tumors

  • Damage to Endocrine Gland

  • Auto-immune Disorders

  • Hereditary Gene Mutations

Kidneys

  • Two bean-shaped organs which are a part of your urinary system which filter your blood and produce the following hormones:

  • Renin

  • Erythropoietin

  • Active form of Vitamin D (Vitamin D is a pro-hormone which converts your body into a hormone.)

Liver

  • Essential organ and gland which is a part of your digestive system and performs hundreds of functions.

Responsible for producing hormones such as:

  • Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1)

  • Angiotensinogen

Adipose (Fat) Tissue

  • Located all over your body including under your skin, between muscles, around internal organs, breast tissue, and in bone marrow often referred to as body fat.

Makes and releases the following hormones:

  • Adiponectin

  • Estrogen

  • Angiotensin

  • Leptin

  • Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

Ovaries

  • Located on both sides of the uterus below the opening of the fallopian tubes and are part of the female reproductive system.

  • Contains the egg cells needed for reproduction and produces hormones such as:

  • Estrogen

  • Progesterone

  • Testosterone

Testes

  • Pair located in a pouch outside the body below the penis and are part of the male reproductive system.

Responsible for producing sperm and the hormone

  • Testosterone

Placenta

  • Temporary organ the develops during pregnancy providing oxygen and nutrients to the unborn baby.

Responsible for producing hormones to maintain pregnancy. These include:

  • Estrogen

  • Progesterone


Conditions Caused By Hormone Disorders Too much or too little hormones can create symptoms and potentially lead to health conditions and may require treatment.

Hormone-related Conditions:

  • Diabetes (Types 1 & 2, Gestational)

  • PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome)

  • Infertility (Male & Female)

  • Thyroid Disease (Hypothyroidism, Hyperthyroidism)

  • Obesity

  • Addison's Disease

  • Menopause

  • Cushing's Disease

  • Prolactinoma

Causes of Hormonal Imbalance Can result due to multiple causes such as:

  • Adenomas and Tumors

  • Damage to Endocrine Gland

  • Auto-immune Disorders

  • Hereditary Gene Mutations


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